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Reading skills - TEENAGERS AT WORK


Klausimas #1


TEENAGERS AT WORK

TEENAGE WORKERS:
THE FACTS

     • 43% of schoolchildren between the ages of 13 and 17 work in some form of employment in the UK.
     • The UK has the highest percentage in Europe of working 13- and 14-year-olds - around 30%.
    • Under UK law, teenagers between the ages of 13 and 16 are allowed to work two hours a day on school days, only one of which can be before school. At weekends or during holidays, you can work for up to five hours a day at ages 13 and 14, and for up to eight hours a day at ages 15 and 16.
     • Approximately one in five children will suffer some form of injury at work.

    Last year the European Parliament condemned Britain for allowing teenagers between the ages of 13 and 16 to do part-time jobs. The criticism was made in the European Parliament's annual report on human rights in the European Union. The Parliament in Strasbourg believes that by taking on paid part-time jobs, young people's health, education and general welfare will suffer. The Strasbourg Parliament has since voted in favour of demanding that EU governments set the minimum working age at 16.

     In Britain, more than two million schoolchildren are involved in a huge variety of different part-time jobs. The most popular ways of earning extra pocket money are early-morning paper rounds, 'Saturday jobs' as shop assistants, fruit-picking, milk rounds, catering and babysitting.
      European countries have come a long way since the days of author Charles Dickens, when small children were forced to work long hours climbing up inside chimneys to clean them, or working in cramped and dangerous conditions down coal-mines. Today there is a comprehensive legal system in Britain to protect teenagers who choose to work, and there are regular checks on employers of teenagers, to prevent exploitation. Despite this, some employers are still prepared to risk breaking the law and abuse* child labour. But are the vast majority of part-time jobs really exploiting teenagers? The British government does not think so. While the Labour Party in Britain condemns sweatshops* and the exploitation of children, it supports the idea that schoolchildren should be allowed to work a limited number of hours a week. It believes there are benefits to getting a taste of work at an early age. Young people get experience of the workplace and society, they learn to handle money, they gain a sense of independence and self-respect.
     Why do British schoolchildren work? Most would agree that the main advantage of having a job is the pocket money they earn. Many schools encourage pupils to include details of part-time work in applications for admission to college or university, or for jobs on leaving school. Successfully holding down a part-time job can show that you have initiative and are reliable - valuable qualities in a competitive job market.
 
abuse - exploit (isnaudoti); sweatshops - workplaces where conditions and pay are poor

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Klausimas #2


TEENAGERS AT WORK

TEENAGE WORKERS: 
THE FACTS

     • 43% of schoolchildren between the ages of 13 and 17 work in some form of employment in the UK.
     • The UK has the highest percentage in Europe of working 13- and 14-year-olds - around 30%.
    • Under UK law, teenagers between the ages of 13 and 16 are allowed to work two hours a day on school days, only one of which can be before school. At weekends or during holidays, you can work for up to five hours a day at ages 13 and 14, and for up to eight hours a day at ages 15 and 16.
     • Approximately one in five children will suffer some form of injury at work.

    Last year the European Parliament condemned Britain for allowing teenagers between the ages of 13 and 16 to do part-time jobs. The criticism was made in the European Parliament's annual report on human rights in the European Union. The Parliament in Strasbourg believes that by taking on paid part-time jobs, young people's health, education and general welfare will suffer. The Strasbourg Parliament has since voted in favour of demanding that EU governments set the minimum working age at 16.

     In Britain, more than two million schoolchildren are involved in a huge variety of different part-time jobs. The most popular ways of earning extra pocket money are early-morning paper rounds, 'Saturday jobs' as shop assistants, fruit-picking, milk rounds, catering and babysitting.
      European countries have come a long way since the days of author Charles Dickens, when small children were forced to work long hours climbing up inside chimneys to clean them, or working in cramped and dangerous conditions down coal-mines. Today there is a comprehensive legal system in Britain to protect teenagers who choose to work, and there are regular checks on employers of teenagers, to prevent exploitation. Despite this, some employers are still prepared to risk breaking the law and abuse* child labour. But are the vast majority of part-time jobs really exploiting teenagers? The British government does not think so. While the Labour Party in Britain condemns sweatshops* and the exploitation of children, it supports the idea that schoolchildren should be allowed to work a limited number of hours a week. It believes there are benefits to getting a taste of work at an early age. Young people get experience of the workplace and society, they learn to handle money, they gain a sense of independence and self-respect.
     Why do British schoolchildren work? Most would agree that the main advantage of having a job is the pocket money they earn. Many schools encourage pupils to include details of part-time work in applications for admission to college or university, or for jobs on leaving school. Successfully holding down a part-time job can show that you have initiative and are reliable - valuable qualities in a competitive job market.
 
abuse - exploit (isnaudoti); sweatshops - workplaces where conditions and pay are poor 

Which statements are true (YES) and which are false (NO)?

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